University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Attachment styles, negotiation of goal conflict, and perceived partner support during COVID-19

Attachment styles, negotiation of goal conflict, and perceived partner support during COVID-19
Attachment styles, negotiation of goal conflict, and perceived partner support during COVID-19
Due to the pandemic, people have been stuck indoors with their partners for months. Instead of being able to rely on multiple sources of support, many couples have to rely on each other more. We investigated whether goal conflict, successful negotiation of the conflict, and individual differences in attachment styles were associated with perceived partner support to understand factors that may enable or hinder goal pursuit during the pandemic. Participants (n=200) completed a daily diary for a week and weekly longitudinal reports for five weeks. Results showed that higher goal conflict predicted perception of less relational catalyst (RC) support and more anti-RC support from partner, whereas more successful negotiation of goal conflict predicted higher RC support and lower anti-RC support. Attachment avoidance was directly associated with less support whereas attachment anxiety moderated the relationship between goal conflict and support. Implications for partner support during the pandemic are discussed.
COVID-19, partner support, attachment, relationships, goals
0191-8869
Vowels, Laura Marika
c30dc6eb-4a98-4534-b784-499c2d291c5f
Carnelley, Katherine
02a55020-a0bc-480e-a0ff-c8fe56ee9c36
Vowels, Laura Marika
c30dc6eb-4a98-4534-b784-499c2d291c5f
Carnelley, Katherine
02a55020-a0bc-480e-a0ff-c8fe56ee9c36

Vowels, Laura Marika and Carnelley, Katherine (2020) Attachment styles, negotiation of goal conflict, and perceived partner support during COVID-19. Personality and Individual Differences. ().

Record type: Article

Abstract

Due to the pandemic, people have been stuck indoors with their partners for months. Instead of being able to rely on multiple sources of support, many couples have to rely on each other more. We investigated whether goal conflict, successful negotiation of the conflict, and individual differences in attachment styles were associated with perceived partner support to understand factors that may enable or hinder goal pursuit during the pandemic. Participants (n=200) completed a daily diary for a week and weekly longitudinal reports for five weeks. Results showed that higher goal conflict predicted perception of less relational catalyst (RC) support and more anti-RC support from partner, whereas more successful negotiation of goal conflict predicted higher RC support and lower anti-RC support. Attachment avoidance was directly associated with less support whereas attachment anxiety moderated the relationship between goal conflict and support. Implications for partner support during the pandemic are discussed.

Text
201105 negotiation support PAID revision accepted version - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 6 November 2022.
Available under License .
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 November 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 November 2020
Keywords: COVID-19, partner support, attachment, relationships, goals

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445065
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445065
DOI:
ISSN: 0191-8869
PURE UUID: 8224dc6e-c2fe-4390-8f98-a6c4e81365f3
ORCID for Laura Marika Vowels:

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Nov 2020 17:35
Last modified: 18 Nov 2020 17:35

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author:
Author:

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using , developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×