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Imagery in adolescent anxiety disorders

Imagery in adolescent anxiety disorders
Imagery in adolescent anxiety disorders
Background: mental imagery plays an important role in models of anxiety disorders in adults. This understanding rests on qualitative and quantitative studies. Qualitative studies of imagery in anxious adolescents have not been reported in the literature.

Aims: to address this gap, we aimed to explore adolescents’ experiences of spontaneous imagery in the context of anxiety disorders.

Method: we conducted one-to-one semi-structured interviews, with 13 adolescents aged 13-17 years with a DSM-5 anxiety disorder, regarding their experiences of spontaneous imagery. We analysed participants’ responses using thematic analysis.

Results: we identified five super-ordinate themes relating to adolescents’ influences on images, distractions from images, controllability of images, emotional responses to imagery and contextual influences on imagery.

Conclusions: our findings suggest spontaneous images are an important phenomenon in anxiety disorders in adolescents, associated with negative emotions during and after their occurrence. Contextual factors and adolescents’ own cognitive styles appear to influence adolescents’ experiences of images in anxiety disorders.
anxiety disorders, imagery, adolescents
1352-4658
Ghita, Anna
e8dac55c-e501-4c76-b194-688100ac0b64
Tooley, Emma
4bc4bf39-2584-435f-9116-1f6e5e975fad
Lawrence, Peter
0d45e107-38ef-4932-aec1-504573de01ef
Ghita, Anna
e8dac55c-e501-4c76-b194-688100ac0b64
Tooley, Emma
4bc4bf39-2584-435f-9116-1f6e5e975fad
Lawrence, Peter
0d45e107-38ef-4932-aec1-504573de01ef

Ghita, Anna, Tooley, Emma and Lawrence, Peter (2020) Imagery in adolescent anxiety disorders. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy. (). (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: mental imagery plays an important role in models of anxiety disorders in adults. This understanding rests on qualitative and quantitative studies. Qualitative studies of imagery in anxious adolescents have not been reported in the literature.

Aims: to address this gap, we aimed to explore adolescents’ experiences of spontaneous imagery in the context of anxiety disorders.

Method: we conducted one-to-one semi-structured interviews, with 13 adolescents aged 13-17 years with a DSM-5 anxiety disorder, regarding their experiences of spontaneous imagery. We analysed participants’ responses using thematic analysis.

Results: we identified five super-ordinate themes relating to adolescents’ influences on images, distractions from images, controllability of images, emotional responses to imagery and contextual influences on imagery.

Conclusions: our findings suggest spontaneous images are an important phenomenon in anxiety disorders in adolescents, associated with negative emotions during and after their occurrence. Contextual factors and adolescents’ own cognitive styles appear to influence adolescents’ experiences of images in anxiety disorders.

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Accepted/In Press date: 4 November 2020
Keywords: anxiety disorders, imagery, adolescents

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Local EPrints ID: 444992
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444992
DOI:
ISSN: 1352-4658
PURE UUID: effa2a63-4e35-4fa9-b1e0-c1675fe7debd
ORCID for Peter Lawrence:

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Date deposited: 17 Nov 2020 17:31
Last modified: 17 Nov 2020 17:39

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