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Are universities finally complying with EU directive on accessibility?

Are universities finally complying with EU directive on accessibility?
Are universities finally complying with EU directive on accessibility?
UK undergraduate disabled students have a consistently lower than average overall satisfaction rate than non-disabled students and are doing less well in terms of continuing their course (0.9 percentage points), degree attainment (2.8 percentage points), and progression onto highly skilled employment or postgraduate study (1.8 percentage points). The UK Office for students October 2020 Insight brief identified that universities need to build considerations of inclusivity and accessibility into curriculum design, programme review, and purchasing of services and equipment; offer alternative formats of lectures and course materials as standard practice; and provide better advice, guidance and training on digital accessibility for staff.

This year university education has been forced to move online due to the health risks from the coronavirus (COVID-19). While this may have had some advantages and disadvantages for students with disabilities compared to their previous on-campus education experience, it has clearly highlighted the importance of digital accessibility.
Wald, Michael
90577cfd-35ae-4e4a-9422-5acffecd89d5
Wald, Michael
90577cfd-35ae-4e4a-9422-5acffecd89d5

Wald, Michael (2020) Are universities finally complying with EU directive on accessibility? Media & Learning s10现金竞猜.

Record type: Article

Abstract

UK undergraduate disabled students have a consistently lower than average overall satisfaction rate than non-disabled students and are doing less well in terms of continuing their course (0.9 percentage points), degree attainment (2.8 percentage points), and progression onto highly skilled employment or postgraduate study (1.8 percentage points). The UK Office for students October 2020 Insight brief identified that universities need to build considerations of inclusivity and accessibility into curriculum design, programme review, and purchasing of services and equipment; offer alternative formats of lectures and course materials as standard practice; and provide better advice, guidance and training on digital accessibility for staff.

This year university education has been forced to move online due to the health risks from the coronavirus (COVID-19). While this may have had some advantages and disadvantages for students with disabilities compared to their previous on-campus education experience, it has clearly highlighted the importance of digital accessibility.

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Published date: 2020
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Local EPrints ID: 444990
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444990
PURE UUID: e4d3d4c4-69d0-4e7c-9c03-4bd1b57ac3ae

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Date deposited: 17 Nov 2020 17:30
Last modified: 17 Nov 2020 17:30

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Author: Michael Wald

University divisions

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